Upcoming Publications by Aaron Baird

Posted On March 31, 2014
Categories News Releases
  • Associating consumer perceived value with business models for digital services
    Baird, Aaron, and T. S. Raghu. “Associating consumer perceived value with business models for digital services.” European Journal of Information Systems (Forthcoming).
    We seek to demonstrate that consumer value for digital service business models may be quite different even when consumers have similar preferences for standard technology characteristics. In the context of this paper, we specifically consider consumer perceived value associated with Personal Health Records (PHRs) and PHR digital business models, through the use of an integrated latent variable and choice empirical model.
  • When traditionally inseparable services are separated by technology: The case of patient portal features offered by primary care providers
    Baird, Aaron, et al. “When traditionally inseparable services are separated by technology: The case of patient portal features offered by primary care providers.” Health Systems (Forthcoming).
    Suboptimal demand-side usage of patient portals, especially at the primary care level, could have significant negative implications for patient-centered policy initiatives predicated on patient empowerment and engagement. This paper contributes to this important policy context by reporting findings from a study designed to assess patient perceptions associated with hypothetical patient portal features offered by PCPs and potential subsequent impacts to PCP loyalty and switching propensity. We find that patient portal features focused on back-office (clinical) self-service capabilities (such viewing health records or summaries from prior visits) are perceived positively by consumers, but, interestingly, clinical digital communication and collaboration features (such as online video consultations with physicians) do not have significant perception impacts. These findings suggest that patient portals may act as a complement to health-care service delivery, while substitution for clinical in-person interactions may not be viewed positively.
  • Corporate Governance and the Adoption of Health Information Technology Within Integrated Delivery Systems
    Baird, Aaron, et al. “Corporate Governance and the Adoption of Health Information Technology Within Integrated Delivery Systems.” Health Care Management Review (Forthcoming).
    Although several previous studies have found “system affiliation” to be a significant and positive predictor of health information technology (IT) adoption, little is known about the association between corporate governance practices and adoption of IT within U.S. integrated delivery systems (IDSs). Rooted in agency theory and corporate governance research, this study examines the association between corporate governance practices (centralization of IT decision rights and strategic alignment between business and IT strategy) and IT adoption, standardization, and innovation within IDSs. We find that although IT adoption and standardization are likely to benefit from corporate governance practices within IDSs, innovation is likely to be delayed. In addition, corporate governance is not one-size-fits-all, and contingencies are important considerations.